Yossi Milo, one of my favorite galleries in Manhattan, will participate in the PULSE Miami Contemporary Art Fair (December 3-7).   I’ve seen work by two of the artists representing Yossi at the event,  Sze Tsung Leong and Loretta Lux.  Leong is perhaps the best landscape photographer working today.  Last summer, I viewed some of his large format color prints from the gallery’s  flat files.  Those prints are part of his series History Images, which Steidl published as a book under the same title.  The work is a stunning depiction of China during rapid urbanization, as ancient aspects of the culture seemed overwhelmed by contemporary structures. Moving to Lux, the press release for PULSE speaks of her digitally manipulated portraits referencing Velasquez and Goya.  Her work could also be seen as a more innocent version of Balthus with a twist of Magritte:  generally restrained palette occasionally bursting with bright color, stillness and spare composition, yet with a psychological tension and eerie quality that linger.   You will not pass quickly from one of her photographs to the next.  They tend to keep you invested.  The descriptions below are from the gallery press release.
                                                                

 Shanghai by Sze Tsung Leong

Shanghai by Sze Tsung Leong

 

Sze Tsung Leong’s ongoing series of color photographs, titled Cities, depicts urban overviews from around the world.  The artist uses repetition in composition and viewpoint to reveal parallels and differences between the disparate constructed environments of various cities.  The artist’s book History Images was published by Steidl in 2006, and a catalogue for his ongoing series Horizons was published by the gallery in 2008.  Sze Tsung Leong was born in Mexico City in 1970 and currently lives and works in New York.

 

 

 

lorettalux


Loretta Lux creates imaginary portraits which address the idea of childhood as a paradise lost.  The artist utilizes photography, painting and digital imaging to execute her compositions, creating scenarios of isolation and distance that occur in an ambiguous time and space while referencing paintings by Old Masters, such as Bronzino, Velasquez and Goya.

Loretta Lux was awarded the 2005 International Center of Photography’s Infinity Award.  Her work is included in numerous museum collections, and a travelling retrospective of her work has been exhibited in venues such as the Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland; Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico; and the Fotomuseum den Haag, The Hague.  Loretta Lux was born in Dresden in 1969.