Conceptual Art


Intersection II:  Public Intimacy

Study of gesture and intimacy in public. Greenville, SC. Video at 25% normal speed with no sound.  This is the video counterpart to a series of digital narrative images I’ve been making to explore nuances of gesture and interaction on the street.

Pedestrian Micro Gestures, Greenville, SC. This is the video counterpart to a series of digital narrative images I’ve been working on downtown, exploring nuances of gesture and interaction on the street.

In researching artists whose practice combines photography and constructed landscapes, I found some interesting work by Vanessa Marsh.  Last May, she had a solo exhibition, Always Close But Never Touching,  at Ampersand International Arts in San Francisco.  One of her pieces from that exhibition was Incomplete Highway On-Ramp, Seattle, WA.

 

Incomplete Freeway On-Ramp, Seattle, WA

 

Installation View: Incomplete Freeway On-Ramp, Seattle, WA

 

Vanessa Marsh’s Artist Statement


It was in high school that I began to find my true artistic vision. It started with a basic photography class and my mom’s old Nikon E series camera. The next year I had my first car and would take long drives out onto the edges of the Seattle suburbs. Wandering through the damp richness of Washington State, I rediscovered a landscape I had grown up with; flooded fields and medians overgrown with blackberry bushes, evergreens dripping with water and rivers always at capacity. I found myself fearless with my camera, exploring defunct industrial sites, climbing past “no trespassing” signs, keeping my eye out for security guards and taking as many shots as I could. I’d let myself into abandoned houses decaying with mold and half heartedly boarded up, looking for the perfect pile of detritus to photograph; an open fridge in the backyard or a baby carriage overgrown with blackberry vines. These buildings were all on the edges of fields that within a few years would become Wal-Marts or a sea of cookie cutter houses, not yet torn down, but no longer functioning as they were originally intended. They were places where I shouldn’t have been but where there was no one left to tell me to get out.

The idea of spaces between meanings became a fascination for me whether regarding the physical landscape, in considering memory or in making art. I think about ways that my art can tell a truth and yet be rooted in imagination simultaneously. My practice of model building began as a means to create a certain kind of photograph, an image that was at once real and surreal. As I worked more with miniatures I realized that the experience of looking into a model was similar to the feeling of being in abandoned places: of being an unintended visitor in a place that is at once somewhere and nowhere.

The models are built referencing snap shots and many details are filled in from my own imagination. When I build the models I am thinking of the places I’ve explored on the outskirts of Seattle, places on the brink of evolution and extinction – between meanings.

Building the models is an attempt to fully embrace my own sentimentality of where I grew up; the home where I no longer live. The environment where I feel the most comfortable yet choose not to be. The models are about recreating something important again that has been deemed unusable and outdated. In building them I am creating on a miniature scale a part of my own history, exploring the ways in which memory and identity are tied not only to location but also to one’s own imagination.

For  an interview with Vanessa Marsh by Matthew Hughes Boyko:  Click Here


Sea Metal Moon No. 1

 

Paul Kenny’s Artist Statement

Seaworks

 

I have for many years made studio works using material gathered from the landscape, stones, shells, and driftwood etc. In common with many people, I have always brought home “treasures” from the sea pebbles, shells etc. They act as an “aide – memoir”, bringing the landscape into your home so a mere glimpse or touch might recall the feelings of being alone on a remote beach.

Realising that I (naturally) tended to bring back to the studio particularly beautiful objects to photograph, I began to make works out of increasingly insignificant material collected at random rather than highly selected. In 1999 I made a series of works called “A day at the beach” which were studio works made from (literally) a random handful of beach material collected after a walk on a beach, arranged and photographed in the studio.

Out of this work came the idea to find the most trivial and insignificant thing from which to make beautiful and thought provoking work. I started to bring sea water back from my trips to remote beaches and it took about four years to fully develop techniques where I can construct a negative made of sea water dried and crystallised in an organised manner on clear acetate or glass plated. They take many days to make, repeatedly applying drops of seawater and waiting for it to dry. I call them Seaworks.

 

Blue Cheswick Moon

 

 

Full Moon Over Mayo

 

 

Flying Over Colonsay

I just read the press release for Swimming Pool, an installation by Leandro Erlich currently on view at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Long Island City.  I’m going to see Erlich’s work as well as the Kenneth Anger retrospective also at P.S. 1. All photographs below are by Matthew Septimus.  Text of the press release follows:

 

Swimming Pool by Leandro Erlich.  Photo: Matthew Septimus.

Leandro Erlich: Swimming Pool

On view October 19, 2008 – October 5, 2009

 

P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center presentsLeandro Erlich: Swimming Pool, an extraordinary and visually confounding installation by the Argentine artist Leandro Erlich. Leandro Erlich: Swimming Poolwill be on view in P.S.1’s unique, double-height Duplex gallery from October 19, 2008 through April 13, 2009.

Leandro Erlich is known for installations that seem to defy the basic laws of physics and befuddle the viewer, who is introduced into jarring environments that momentarily threaten a sense of balance or space. For this exhibition, Erlich presents one of his most well-known and critically acclaimed pieces, Swimming Pool. Speaking about the project, Erlich says: “When I first visited P.S.1, I remember thinking how perfect the Duplex space would be for the installation ofSwimming Pool. This space divided the experience of seeing the work perfectly, and in the correct order. Almost ten years since its creation, Swimming Pool is finally in the exhibition space for which I have always felt is so perfectly suited.”

 

Swimming Pool by Leandro Erlich.  Photo: Matthew Septimus.

 

Erlich has constructed a full-size pool, complete with all its trappings, including a deck and a ladder. When approached from the first floor, visitors are confronted with a surreal scene: people, fully clothed, can be seen standing, walking, and breathing beneath the surface of the water. It is only when visitors enter the Duplex gallery from the basement that they recognize that the pool is empty, its construction a visual trick fashioned by the artist. A large, continuous piece of acrylic spans the pool and suspends water above it, creating the illusion of a standard swimming pool that is both disorienting and humorous.

 

Swimming Pool by Leandro Erlich.  Photo: Matthew Septimus

 

Swimming Pool by Leandro Erlich.  Photo: Matthew Septimus

 

Leandro Erlich (b. 1973, Buenos Aires) has been exhibiting his work internationally for over ten years. He has had solo shows at the Centre d’Art Santa Mònica, Barcelona (2003); MACRO Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma (2006), and Le Grand Café, Centre d’Art Contemporain de Saint-Nazaire (2005). He represented Argentina at the 49th Venice Biennale (2001), where he showed Swimming Pool, and was also featured in the Singapore Biennale (2008), the Liverpool Biennial (2008), 7th Havana Biennale (2001), the 7th Istanbul Biennial (2001), the 3rd Shanghai Biennale (2002), the 1st Busan Biennale (2002), and the 26th Bienal de São Paulo (2004). His work will be shown in the upcoming Prospect.1 New Orleans Biennial in 2008. He lives and works in Buenos Aires.

 

Organized by P.S.1 Director Alanna Heiss.

The exhibition is made possible by David Teiger, Estrellita B. Brodsky and Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

 I missed the opening of Myoung Ho Lee’s exhibition of large format color photographs at Yossi Milo last night.  But I hope to see the work this weekend.  The press release and images below are from the gallery website.

 

Tree #5, Archival Inkjet Print by Myoung Ho Lee (2007)

Tree #5, Archival Inkjet Print by Myoung Ho Lee (2007)

 

 

Tree

March 19 – April 18, 2009

 

Yossi Milo Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of color photographs by Myoung Ho Lee, entitled Tree. The exhibition will open on Thursday, March 19 and close on Saturday, April 18.  This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in the United States. 

 Myoung Ho Lee photographs solitary trees framed against white canvas backdrops in the middle of natural landscapes. To install the large canvases, which span approximately 60 by 45 feet, the artist enlists a production crew and heavy cranes. Minor components of the canvas support system, such as ropes or bars, are later removed from the photograph through minimal digital retouching, creating the illusion that the backdrop is floating behind the tree.  

 

Tree #2, Archival Inkjet Print by Myoung Ho Lee (2006)

Tree #2, Archival Inkjet Print by Myoung Ho Lee (2006)

 

The series includes diverse species of trees photographed with a 4×5 camera in a variety of seasons and at different times of day. Mr. Lee allows the tree’s natural surroundings to fill the frame around the canvas, transforming the backdrop into an integral part of the subject. Centered in the graphic compositions, the canvas defines the form of the tree and separates it from the environment. By creating a partial, temporary outdoor studio for each tree, Mr. Lee’s “portraits” of trees play with ideas of scale and perception while referencing traditional painting and the history of photography.

Myoung Ho Lee is the recipient of awards including the first Young Photographer’s Award from the Photo Artist’s Society of Korea in 2005, Korea’s Photography Critics Award in 2006 and a grant from the Culture and Art Fund from the Arts Council of Korea in 2007. Mr. Lee was born in Daejon, South Korea in 1975 and currently lives and works in Seoul, South Korea.

 

 

Gallery Information

Hours:

Tuesday–Saturday 10 am–6 pm

Location:

525 West 25th Street
New York, NY 10001

phone: 212-414-0370
fax: 212-414-0371

info@yossimilo.com

 

 

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