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As part of Alternative Processes:  A Group Photography Show, I gave a visiting artist talk, along with  photographers Kim Sholly and Blake Smith, in the Vandiver Gallery of the Thrift Library at Anderson University on February 2, 2017. We had great attendance for the opening event of the spring semester.  The gallery was packed with students from the Department of Art and Design at Anderson, as well as a large number of interested students other departments.

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Alternative Processes is concerned with non-digital photographic processes, and most of the work in the exhibition was made using the historic 19th century wet plate collodion process, along with traditional black and white darkroom processes.

My latest tintype portrait work is featured with the work of three other artists in “New Faces 2016” at the Upstairs Artspace Gallery in Tryon, NC.  The exhibition opened on March 12, 2016 and runs through April 22nd.

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At the Opening of New Faces 2016.  Photo Credit:  Anthony Milian

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At the Opening of New Faces 2016.  Photo Credit:  Anthony Milian

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I will be giving a visiting artist talk at Furman University on June 2nd. The Olli Program for retired professionals has invited me to discuss 19th century photography and to present my wet plate collodion work to a class called “Reflections on Photography.” The class is held in the Herring Center for Continuing Education.  If the weather is nice, I’d like to do a demonstration of the process at the historic Cherrydale house on campus.

Cherrrydale House, Furman University

Cherrydale Alumni House (c. 1857-1860), Furman University

As I’ve worked in the wet plate collodion process, I’ve accumulated many images that show extreme effects of chemical reactions and accidents of the process.  Sometimes colder temperatures caused the developer not to flow properly.  In other instances, the collodion was too old and formed on the plate in a mottled way as it was poured.  Then there were also cases of silver nitrate flowing across the plate and leaving traces of movement while the plate was in the camera holder.  Finally, there were some plates that had contaminants on their surfaces — specks of dust, and such.  These are among my favorites.

Maliasmark Rust and Ruin Reborn

In a recent post on Meliasmark Rust and Ruin Reborn, my studio at Taylors Mill was listed as one of the spots to visit during the upcoming First Friday arts evening in Greenville (May 3rd).  Click the link above for the text of the full blog post.

Portrait of Caren Lasseter

Tintype of Caren Lasseter made last weekend outside my studio in Taylors, SC.  This is a whole plate (6.5″ x 8.5″) shot with an 1872 Ross portrait lens.  Exposure 7 sec. during late afternoon.   19th Century wet plate collodion process.