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As part of Alternative Processes:  A Group Photography Show, I gave a visiting artist talk, along with  photographers Kim Sholly and Blake Smith, in the Vandiver Gallery of the Thrift Library at Anderson University on February 2, 2017. We had great attendance for the opening event of the spring semester.  The gallery was packed with students from the Department of Art and Design at Anderson, as well as a large number of interested students other departments.

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Alternative Processes is concerned with non-digital photographic processes, and most of the work in the exhibition was made using the historic 19th century wet plate collodion process, along with traditional black and white darkroom processes.

Portrait of Manuel - Tintype

Tintype portrait of artist Manuel Schmettau that I made on his visit to my studio with Ann Stoddard (a colleague from the Wofford College fine arts faculty). Whole plate (6.5″ x 8.5″), 19th century wet plate collodion.

 

Portrait of Isobelle

Whole plate tintype (6.5″ x 8.5″).  19th century wet plate collodion process.  7 sec. exposure under 12 6500K UV tubes.  I made this portrait in my studio at Taylors Mill.

Rev. Keith Turbeville

Rev. Keith Turbeville

Tintype portrait of Rev. Keith Turbeville taken recently in my studio at Taylors Mill.  Keith is an Episcopal priest, who just completed his tenure as an associate minister at Christ Church Episcopal in Greenville, SC.  He and his family are  moving to Texas, and he will become rector of a new church, Holy Trinity by the Lake in Rockwall (near Dallas).

This image was made using the 19th century wet plate collodion process, which was invented in 1851 and replaced Daguerreotypes as the most popular means of studio photography.  Wet plate collodion was the primary means of making photographs through the 1880s.  For this tintype, I used a reproduction 19th century wooden box camera with bellows and an original brass barrel Ross lens made in London in 1872.  The exposure time was 4 seconds under two arrays of 6500K UV lights.

Maliasmark Rust and Ruin Reborn

In a recent post on Meliasmark Rust and Ruin Reborn, my studio at Taylors Mill was listed as one of the spots to visit during the upcoming First Friday arts evening in Greenville (May 3rd).  Click the link above for the text of the full blog post.

Portrait of Caren Lasseter

Tintype of Caren Lasseter made last weekend outside my studio in Taylors, SC.  This is a whole plate (6.5″ x 8.5″) shot with an 1872 Ross portrait lens.  Exposure 7 sec. during late afternoon.   19th Century wet plate collodion process.

Isabella Sophie Gerber

Whole plate ambrotype  (6.5″ x 8.5″) of Isabella Sophie Gerber shot in my studio recently under UV light.  An ambrotype is a slightly underexposed image made on a glass plate using the wet plate collodion photographic process.  It appears as a negative until placed against a dark background, which reverses the tones, rendering the image as a positive.

This ambrotype was shot using two six-tube arrays of UV lights.  Each array contained five 48″ 6500K fluorescent tubes + one 48″ blacklight.  I used a 19th century reproduction tailboard camera with an original 1872 brass barrel Ross portrait lens (f/4) made in London.  Exposure time was 10 seconds.